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Christopher J. Gobler


gobler-headshotProfessor

Ph.D., 1999, Stony Brook University

Christopher.Gobler@stonybrook.edu

Coastal ecosystem ecology, climate change, harmful algal blooms, phytoplankton, ocean acidification, effects of multiple stressors on coastal marine resources, aquatic biogeochemistry

Gobler Laboratory page

 


 

Research Interests

We research global coastal change within three major realms:

Harmful algal blooms:

Our group is interested in understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and how that functioning can be effected by man or can affect man. We focus much of our efforts investigating the organisms at the base of aquatic food webs, phytoplankton, and have been particularly focused on harmful algae. We investigate harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by multiple classes of phytoplankton (cyanophyceae, dinophyceae, bacillariophyceae, pelagophyceae, ulvophyceae) in diverse ecosystems (e.g. estuaries, lakes, coastal ocean) using multiple approaches (field studies, laboratory experimental, field experiments, molecular investigations, modeling). Collectively, these studies have identified how nutrients, CO2 levels, zooplankton grazing, viral lysis, allelopathy and grazing by bivalves influence the dynamics of HABs caused by genera such as Alexandrium, Anabaena, Aureococcus, Aureoumbra, Cochlodinium, Dinophysis, Microcystis, Pseuodonitzschia, and Ulva.

Interactions between climate change and eutrophication:

The second major research focus within our laboratory is understanding how climate change and coastal ocean acidification affects marine organisms and ecosystems. The combustion of fossil fuels has enriched levels of CO2 in the world’s oceans and decreased ocean pH. The degradation of anthropogenically-enriched organic matter in coastal ecosystems seasonally has a similar effect on ocean chemistry today, while concurrently depressing dissolved oxygen levels. The continuation of these processes can alter the growth, survival, and diversity of marine organisms. Within this realm, we have been engaged in studies investigating how future and current coastal ocean acidification effects the survival and performance of algae and larvae from bivalves and fish indigenous to North America. We further strive to understand how co-occurring stressors related to both climate change and shallow coastal ecosystems (hypoxia, thermal stress, algal blooms) may act and interact to effect the performance of marine animals.

Phase shifts in coastal ecosystems:

A third area of interest of my lab group is the understanding the ecological functioning and trophic status of shallow marine ecosystems. We investigate how anthropogenic activities such as eutrophication and the depletion of fisheries may alter the natural ecological and/or biogeochemical functioning of coastal ecosystems. In many cases, we have explored the quantitative importance and impacts of various nitrogen loading pathways on primary producers or the interactions and feedbacks among nutrient delivery pathways, pelagic phytoplankton communities, benthic filter feeders, and benthic autotrophs such as seagrass. All of these studies have important societal impacts and relevance for the management of shallow, coastal ecosystems.


Publications

Complete Publications List on Google Scholar


 

The News Articles below feature Dr. Gobler:

News from the NAno-Raman Molecular Imaging Laboratory (NARMIL)

In September, we celebrated the first anniversary of Ms. Tanya Zaliznyak joining the SoMAS staff and taking the helm at NARMIL.  Her first year has been filled with exciting accomplishments demonstrating that this facility is reaching its scientific potential. We’d...

Postdoctoral/Senior Postdoctoral Associate* – 1602665

The School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) of Stony Brook University seeks applicants for a Postdoctoral Associate position under Prof. Chris Gobler‘s supervision. Required Qualifications (as evidenced by an attached resume): PhD in Biology, Marine...

Vax to Flax 2016

The 2016 Vax to Flax Run was held on Saturday April 30th on a beautiful sunny day. The race course followed the Vax-to-Vax format (seen on the right) where the race starts at SoMAS and travels clockwise around Circle Drive to return back to SoMAS. Seven faculty and post docs raced against eleven students. As has been the recent tradition, the faculty times overall beat the student times.

SoMAS Professor Christopher Gobler wins national honor

From Stony Brook researcher Christopher Gobler wins national honor (Newsday, April 26, 2016) by Rachel Uda The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is honoring Stony Brook University Professor Christopher Gobler for his research on Long Island’s water quality...

SoMAS Alumni Reunite at 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans

SoMAS faculty and alumni attending the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting in New Orleans gathered for an alumni reunion. Professors Gordon Taylor and Mary Scranton organized the event and invited SoMAS alumni present at the conference to reunite.  Other SoMAS faculty in...

Gobler Lab Set To Launch Georgica Pond Research Project

Toxic algae blooms are among the most serious health risks in East Hampton pond From Lauren Sheprow at the Stony Brook Newsroom EAST HAMPTON, N.Y., May 20, 2015 – Stony Brook University has partnered with a group of homeowners from the Georgica Pond community,...

Flax to Vax 2015

The Annual SoMAS tradition that puts Students against Faculty took place on Saturday, April 25th. The course this year followed the same path as last year, starting at SoMAS (former home of the Vax computer system) and circling around campus around Circle Drive to...

Turning Brown Tide Blue – Clams for Clams Event July 11, 2014

On Friday, July 11th the Stony Brook Foundation will be hosting a cocktail reception at the picturesque Marine Sciences Center located at the Stony Brook University’s Southampton campus. The event is to raise funds as well as public awareness toward the many problems facing Shinnecock Bay and what Stony Brook University scientists are doing to combat them.

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