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David Taylor

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., 1994, University of Tennessee

david.j.taylor@stonybrook.edu

environmental humanities, history of naturalist studies, American Literature, nature writing

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David Taylor is an Assistant Professor of Sustainability. His writing crosses disciplinary boundaries and genres—poetry, creative non-fiction, scholarship and science/technical writing; however, at the core of his work always is the concern for environmental sustainability and community. His poetry includes a book Praying Up the Sun (Pecan Grove Press, 2008) and a chapbook The Log from The Sea of Cortez: A Poem Series (Wings Press, 2013) based on John Steinbeck’s 1940 collecting trip with biologist Ed Ricketts.

He has published poetry extensively in the US and internationally. Steve Wolverton and he co-edited and contributed to a collection of essays about an interdisciplinary project on Mesa Verde archaeological sites and their representations to the public, titled Sushi in Cortez: Essays from the Edge of Academia (University of Utah Press, 2015). Also, he wrote an extensive introduction and edited “… a man of high character”: The Letters, Lectures, and Essays of Dr. John Perkins Barratt (University of South Carolina Press. 2015). Barratt was a mid-19th-century naturalist and physician responsible for much of the early conservation movement in South Carolina. Natural history writing and creative non-fiction includes Lawson’s Fork: Headwaters to the Confluence (Hub City Press, 2000), a personal narrative on the history and natural history of Lawson’s Fork, Spartanburg’s local river. Since his return to Texas, he edited an anthology, Pride of Place: A Contemporary Anthology of Texas Nature Writing(UNT Press, 2006) and was interviewed about this book on NPR on Earth Day, 2006.

Most recently, David served as Lead Faculty on a Summer 2014 Study Abroad class “Cuba and the Complexities of Sustainability.” He organized faculty from biology, geography, and film to take an interdisciplinary approach to issues of sustainability in a uniquely important place. He is returning to Cuba in the fall of 2014 to work with a film crew and Artes Escenicas documenting Escambray, a performing arts group combining theatre and environmental outreach in rural areas in the mountains outside of Sancti Spiritus.

 

 

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Professor David Taylor reflects on his summer travels

This summer, Dr. David Taylor, one of our newest faculty members, spent time traveling out west. Below is a blog post he wrote during his experience for the Center for Humans and Nature, a reflection on his experience as a modern-day person navigating a traditionally...

Documenting Cuba’s cultural mission to help protect the environment

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Our very own Sustainability Studies Program faculty member Dr. Taylor has officially been inaugurated into the Stony Brook Community of Awesome! Check out this...

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