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SoMAS authors contributed 3 of the 21 invited papers published in 2019 edition of the Annual Review of Marine Sciences.  The invitation to contribute to the Annual Review of Marine Sciences is a significant honor for the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University, highlighting the great work of our faculty.

The three papers included in the Annual Review featured the work of Drs. Gordon Taylor, Mary Scranton and Cindy Lee:

1) Taylor GT.  (2019). Windows into microbial seascapes: Advances in nanoscale imaging and application to marine science. Annual Review of Marine Sciences 11:465–90.

2) Muller-Karger F, Astor Y, Benitez-Nelson C, Buck K, Fanning K, Lorenzoni L, Montes E, Scranton M, Rueda-Roa D, Taylor G, Thunell R, Tappa E, Varela R. (2019). Scientific legacy of the CARIACO oceanographic time-series program. Annual Review of Marine Sciences 11:413–37.

3) Lee, Cindy (2019). Passing the baton to the next generation: A few problems that need solving. Annual Review of Marine Sciences 11:1-13.

 

Dr. Gordon Taylor highlighted the impact of the CARIACO Ocean Time-Series Program Legacy at SoMAS:

On January 12th, 2017, the last of 232 monthly cruises to the CARIACO time-series station in the southern Caribbean Sea was completed. Commencing in November 1995, this project was an unprecedented collaboration between four Venezuelan and three U.S. academic institutions to document how processing of carbon in this coastal sea varies through time. To launch and sustain this program, SoMAS faculty, Drs. Mary Scranton and Gordon Taylor, teamed up with faculty from the lead institution, University of South Florida (F. Muller-Karger) and University of South Carolina (R. Thunell) to secure National Science

Project CARIACO’s sampling platform: the 75-foot R/V Hermano Gines operated by the Fundación La Salle de Ciencias Naturales (FLASA) located on Margarita Island, Venezuela.

Project CARIACO’s sampling platform: the 75-foot R/V Hermano Gines operated by the Fundación La Salle de Ciencias Naturales (FLASA) located on Margarita Island, Venezuela.

Foundation funding.  Likewise, Venezuelan collaborators secured funding from their own agency. The SoMAS team participated in 42 of these cruises, providing oceanographic training to 28 SoMAS graduate students, data for 8 M.S. and 6 Ph.D. theses, and lab experience for countless undergraduate and high school students. Over its 21 year lifespan, Project CARIACO involved hundreds of researchers, attracted collaborators from 64 institutions world-wide, produced more than 140 peer-reviewed articles so far, resulted in 57 student theses, and created a unique, massive and publicly-available database documenting temporal variations in more than 50 ocean variables.

For more information, visit: http://www.imars.usf.edu/cariaco

The CARIACO Project has been featured on the SoMAS website throughout the years, as well.

The Cariaco Basin Project

Carbon Retention in a Colored Ocean (CARIACO)

Research in the Cariaco Basin: 10 Years and Growing

 

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