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Trace Organic Chemical Mass Spectrometry Laboratory

Offering project-specific HPLC-MS and GC-MS analysis of sediment, soil, aqueous, and tissue samples

The Trace Organic Chemical Mass Spectrometry Laboratory was established at the Marines Sciences Research Center at Stony Brook University under the direction of Prof. Bruce. J. Brownawell in 2001.

The laboratory now offers mass spectrometry and related services to outside investigators on a fee for service basis providing research level and project-specific sample extractions, purifications and GC, HPLC-MS and GC-MS and HPLC analysis of sediment, soil, aqueous, and tissue samples.

Services available include analysis of neutral alkylphenol ethoxylate metabolites, such as nonylphenol; steroid estrogen hormones; modern use pesticides such as organophosphates, pyrethroids, and methoprene; high volume pharmaceuticals; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; polychlorinated biphenyls; and fluorescent whitening agents.

lab_pics

Graduate students assist in sample preparation and analysis under Brownawell’s direction.

 Lab Personnel

Lab Director, Bruce Brownawell, has directed an active research program at Stony Brook University for 16 years, with funding from Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Office of Navel Research (ONR), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Hudson River Foundation, and several not-for-profit organizations and consulting companies.

Contact Information

Director:  Dr. Bruce J. Brownawell 

(631) 632-8658

Lab Fax: (631) 632-3072

School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences Stony Brook University Stony Brook NY 11794-5000

Lab Facilities

HPLC-MS: Waters Micromass LCT Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer with electrospray and APCI sources and Waters Alliance 2695 HPLC

HPLC-MS: Waters Micromass LCT Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer with electrospray and APCI sources and Waters Alliance 2695 HPLC

HPLCs: Shimadzu 850 and Waters 1050 HPLCs with fluorescence and UV/VIS detectors

HPLCs: Shimadzu 850 and Waters 1050 HPLCs with fluorescence and UV/VIS detectors

GCs: HP5970 GCs with FID and ECD detectors

GCs: HP5970 GCs with FID and ECD detectors

GC-MS: VG Quattro triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with EI source and HP5970 capillary with split/splitless injection

GC-MS: VG Quattro triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with EI source and HP5970 capillary with split/splitless injection

       

Pricing

Project costs are estimated from projected hourly costs associated with instrument use and operator time, and will depend upon the sample matrices, desired detection limits, the number of samples to be analyzed in a batch, the time associated with extraction or sample work-up and the extent of QA/QC required.

Instrument and operator time is billed at rate of approximately $60/hr each.

Contact Bruce.Brownawell@Stonybrook.edu to discuss pricing for your specific needs and sample types.

 


Selected recent publications on analytical methods from the Brownawell group

  • Swartz C.H., Reddy S., Benotti M.J., Yin H., Barber L.B.,. Brownawell B.J., Rudel R. (submitted to Environ. Sci. Technol.) An analysis of steroid estrogens, alkylphenols, and other wastewater contaminants leaching into groundwater from a residential septic system on Cape Cod, MA.
  • Zulkowsky A.M., Ruggieri J.P., Terracciano, S.A., Brownawell B.J. and McElroy A.E. (2005) Acute Toxicity of Resmethrin, Malathion, and Methoprene to Larval and Juvenile American Lobsters (Homarus americanus) and Analysis of Pesticide Levels in Surface  Waters after Scourgeâ„¢, Anvilâ„¢ and Altosidâ„¢ Application. J. Shellfish Res. 795-804.
  • Reddy S., Iden C.R., and Brownawell B.J. (2005) Analysis of steroid estrogen conjugates in municipal waste waters by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Anal Chem77, 7032-7038.
  • Reddy S., and Brownawell B.J. (2005) Analysis of estrogens in sediments from a sewage impacted estuary using HPLC-time of flight mass spectrometry. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 24, 1041-1047.
  • Ferguson P.L., Bopp, R.F., Chilrud S.N., Aller R.A., and Brownawell, B.J. (2003)  Biogeochemistry of nonylphenol ethoxylates in urban harbor sediments. Environ. Sci. TechnolEnviron. Sci. Technol. 37, 3499-3506.
  • Benotti M.J, Ferguson, P.L., Rieger, R.A., Iden, C.R, Heine, C.E., and Brownawell, B.J. (2003) HPLC time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An alternative to LC-MS-MS for sensitive and selective determination of polar organic contaminants in the aquatic environment. In: â€œLiquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, MS/MS and Time-of-Flight: Analysis of Emerging Contaminants (eds, M. Thurman and I. Ferrer); American Chemical Society, Wash. DC; pp.109-127.
  • Ferguson, P.L., C.R. Iden, and Brownawell, B.J.  (2001).  Analysis of nonylphenol and nonylphenol ethoxylates in environmental samples using mixed-mode high performance liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry.J. Chromatography A 938, 79-92.
  • Ferguson P.L., Iden C.R., McElroy A.E., and Brownawell B.J. (2001) Determination of steroid estrogens in wastewater by immunoaffinity extraction coupled with HPLC-electrospray-MS. Anal. Chem. 73, 3890-3895.
  • Ferguson, P.L., C.R. Iden, and B.J. Brownawell. (2001) Distribution of neutral alkylphenol ethoxylate metabolites in a sewage-impacted urban estuary. Environ. Sci. Technol. 35, 2438-2435.
  • Ferguson P.L.,  Iden C.R., and Brownawell B.J. (2000) Analysis of alkylphenol ethoxylate metabolites in the aquatic environment using electrospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Anal. Chem. 72, 4322-4330.
  • Lamoureux E.M. and B.J. Brownawell. (1999Chemical and biological availability of sediment associated hydrophobic contaminants. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 18, 1733-1741.
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