BIENNIAL REPORT 2016-2017

Celebrating 50 Years of Making Scientific Research Count at Stony Brook University!

Awards and Honors

Each year, SoMAS confers a number of awards on undergraduate and graduate students in recognition of exceptional academic performance, extramural activities, and service to the SoMAS community.  Additionally, SoMAS faculty members regularly receive national and international recognition from professional and other societies for their scholarship and/or teaching excellence.  Below is a list of awards to SoMAS students and faculty during the report period.  Specific information on the student awards can be found on the SoMAS web site.

Faculty and Staff Honors

Stony Brook Alumni Association Dean’s Choice Award

2016 Charles Bergin, Atmospheric Science; Kristin Welch, Environmental Studies; Julia Donaton, Marine Science; Regina Valentino, Marine Vertebrate Biology; Elizabeth Montello, Ecosystems and Human Impact; Shunna Ide, Environmental Humanities; Nicholas Fusco, Sustainability Studies

2017 Christopher Stubenrauch, Atmospheric Sciences; Savannah Rose, Environmental Studies; Michelle Barbosa Marine Vertebrate Biology; Sarah Matero, Environmental Design, Policy and Policy; Andrea Baatz, Environmental Humanities

2016 Joshua Feldman & Kylie Merrow

2017 Magdalena Wrobel & Joshua Feldman

2016 Nicole Casamassina

2017 Matthew McDermott

2016 Michelle Barbosa & Alfredo Esposito

2017 Julia Petersen & Maria Grima

2017 Andrew Seaman

Best Thesis Awards

2016

  • Adham Younes, MS
  • Natasha Gownaris, PhD

2017

  • Jennifer Jankowiak, MS
  • Alison Flanagan, PhD

2016 Irvin Huang

2017 Lori Clark

Professor Xiangding Wu Memorial Award

2015-2016

2016-2017

2016 Rebecca Kulp

2017 Sabrina Geraci-Yee

2016 Cecilia O’Leary

2017 Abigail Tyrell

Faculty

With the addition of Sustainability Studies, the faculty at SoMAS have grown considerably:

Faculty

Sustainability Studies Faculty

ITPA Faculty

Endowed Professorships

Bassem Allam

Bassem Allam

Endowed Professor of Marinetics

Marine invertebrate physiology and health, Shellfish Genomics, Aquaculture

Josephine Aller

Josephine Aller

Professor

Marine benthic ecology, invertebrate zoology,marine microbiology, biogeochemistry

Robert Aller

Robert Aller

Distinguished Professor

Marine biogeochemistry, marine animal-sediment relations.

Katherine Aubrecht

Katherine Aubrecht

Division Head, Sustainability Studies / Associate Professor / Faculty Director, Coastal Environmental Studies

Phone: 631-632-5360
Fax: 631-632-5375

chemical education, sustainable and green chemistry

Steven Beaupré

Steven Beaupré

Assistant Professor

Marine Biogeochemistry, Chemical kinetics of natural organic matter, radiocarbon analyses

David Black

David Black

Associate Professor

Paleoclimatology, paleoceanography, deep-sea sediments, marine micropaleontology

Henry Bokuniewicz

Henry Bokuniewicz

Distinguished Service Professor

Near shore transport processes, coastal groundwater hydrology, coastal sedimentation, marine geophysics

Malcolm Bowman

Malcolm Bowman

Distinguished Service Professor

Coastal ocean and estuarine dynamics

Bruce Brownawell

Bruce Brownawell

Associate Professor

Biogeochemistry of organic pollutants in seawater and groundwater.

Kurt Bretsch

Kurt Bretsch

Lecturer / Faculty Director, Semester by the Sea

Marine and Environmental Science Education, Coastal Community Ecology

Arlene Kons Cassidy

Arlene Kons Cassidy

Lecturer / Faculty Director, Sustainability Studies

Robert Cerrato

Robert Cerrato

Professor

Benthic ecology, population and community dynamics.

Edmund Chang

Edmund Chang

Professor

Atmospheric dynamics and diagnoses, climate dynamics, synoptic meteorology

J. Kirk Cochran

J. Kirk Cochran

Professor

Marine geo-chemistry, use of radionuclides as geochemical tracers; diagenesis of marine sediments.

Brian Colle

Brian Colle

Professor / Director, ITPA

Extreme weather, coastal meteorology, weather forecasting, regional climate change

Jackie Collier

Jackie Collier

Associate Professor

Phytoplankton physiological ecology; Biocomplexity and microbial diversity; Planktonic ecosystem processes in marine, estuarine, and freshwater systems

Nolwenn Dheilly

Nolwenn Dheilly

Assistant Professor

Evolution of Host-Parasite Interactions

Anthony Dvarskas

Anthony Dvarskas

Assistant Professor

Environmental economics, ecosystem services and resilience of coastal ecosystems, economics of restoration, natural capital accounting

Ali Farhadzadeh

Ali Farhadzadeh

Assistant Professor

Nearshore hydrodynamics, sediment transport, wave-current-sediment-structure interaction, resilient coastal protection systems, coastal flooding

Donovan Finn

Donovan Finn

Assistant Professor / Faculty Director, Environmental Design, Policy, and Planning

community-based planning, disaster recovery, resilience policy, urban design and placemaking

Nicholas Fisher

Nicholas Fisher

Distinguished Professor / Director, CIDER

Marine phytoplankton physiology and ecology, biogeo-chemistry of metals, marine pollution

Charles Flagg

Charles Flagg

Research Professor

Continental Shelf Dynamics, Bio-Physical Interactions in Shelf Systems, Climate Change Effects on Coastal Systems, Shipboard ADCPs on Volunteer Observing Ships

Roger Flood

Roger Flood

Professor Emeritus

Marine geology, sediment dynamics, continental margin sedimentation

Michael French

Michael French

Assistant Professor

supercell and tornado dynamics; Doppler weather radar applications; mesoscale meteorology

Michael Frisk

Michael Frisk

Professor

Fish ecology, population modeling and life history theory

Christopher Gobler

Christopher Gobler

Endowed Chair

Coastal ecosystem ecology, climate change, harmful algal blooms, phytoplankton, ocean acidification, effects of multiple stressors on coastal marine resources, aquatic biogeochemistry

Sultan Hameed

Sultan Hameed

Professor

Climate change: analysis, impacts, and predictability

Heidi Hutner

Heidi Hutner

Associate Professor

Environmental literature and film; ecofeminism; environmental justice; feminism; race studies; women’s literature; Restoration and eighteenth-century literature and culture.

Sung-Gheel (Gil) Jang

Sung-Gheel (Gil) Jang

Assistant Professor / Faculty Director, Geospatial Center

Geospatial Sciences and geographic information systems

Marat Khairoutdinov

Marat Khairoutdinov

Professor

Climate modeling, high-resolution cloud modeling, cloud microphysics, super-parameterization, massively parallel super-computing, cloud parameterization

Hyemi Kim

Hyemi Kim

Associate Professor

low frequency climate variability, tropical meteorology, ocean-atmosphere interaction, prediction and predictability, tropical cyclone activity, extreme events

Daniel Knopf

Daniel Knopf

Professor

Atmospheric Chemistry, Microphysics and Chemistry of Atmospheric Aerosols, Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry and Kinetics

Pavlos Kollias

Pavlos Kollias

Professor

Cloud Microphysics and Dynamics, Environmental Remote Sensing, Radar Meteorology and Technology

Ping Liu

Ping Liu

Research Associate Professor

Climate change, dynamics and modeling; 

Darcy Lonsdale

Darcy Lonsdale

Professor

Ecology and physiology of marine zooplankton; food web dynamics of estuarine plankton and the impacts of harmful algal blooms.

Glenn Lopez

Glenn Lopez

Professor

Marine benthic ecology, animal-sediment interactions

Kamazima Lwiza

Kamazima Lwiza

Associate Professor

Structure and dynamics of shelf-seas and remote sensing oceanography

John Mak

John Mak

Professor

Trace gas isotopic composition for the reconstruction of atmospheric chemistry in the paleo atmosphere; trace gas emissions from the biosphere; development of instrumentation platforms for research aircraft.

Anne McElroy

Anne McElroy

Professor

Aquatic Toxicology

Elizabeth Terese Newman

Elizabeth Terese Newman

Associate Professor

Mesoamerican Ethnohistory, Historical Archaeology, and Environmental Archaeology with a specialty in Zooarchaeology.

Janet Nye

Janet Nye

Associate Professor

Fish ecology, climate variability, global environmental change, ecosystem-based management, ocean acidification, climate change

Emmanuelle Pales-Espinosa

Emmanuelle Pales-Espinosa

Research Associate Professor

Shellfish physiology, Particle selection mechanisms in suspension-feeding bivalves, Algology

Bradley Peterson

Bradley Peterson

Associate Professor

Community ecology of seagrass dominated ecosystems

Ellen Pikitch

Ellen Pikitch

Endowed Professor of Ocean Conservation Science / Executive Director, IOCS

Ocean conservation, fisheries management, ecosystem-based approaches, endangered fishes, sharks, sturgeon

Sharon Pochron

Sharon Pochron

Lecturer / Faculty Director, Ecosystems and Human Impact

ecotoxicology and soil ecology

Roy Price

Roy Price

Adjunct Assistant Professor / Principal Investigator

Hydrothermal vents, water-rock reactions, toxic metal & metalloid cycling in coastal environments, arsenic bioaccumulation, vent-biota relationships, and alkaline shallow-sea vents

H. James Quigley Jr.

H. James Quigley Jr.

Retired Lecturer

Kevin Reed

Kevin Reed

Assistant Professor

Climate Modeling; Tropical Cyclones; Climate Extremes; Atmospheric Dynamics

Tara Rider

Tara Rider

Lecturer

Maritime and Environmental History, Sustainability

Carl Safina

Carl Safina

Endowed Chair

Ocean animals, fisheries, human relationship with nature

Mary Scranton

Mary Scranton

Professor

Marine geochemistry, biological-chemical interactions in seawater

Donna Selch

Donna Selch

Lecturer

Remote Sensing and GIS; water quality modeling; hyperspectral remote sensing; object-based image analysis; environmental and vegetation; digital image analysis; coastal changes; unmanned aerial vehicles

Larry Swanson

Larry Swanson

Associate Dean, SoMAS / Director, WRMI

Coastal Oceanography, marine pollution, marine policy, recycling and reuse of waste materials, waste management

David Taylor

David Taylor

Assistant Professor / Faculty Director, EHM

environmental humanities, history of naturalist studies, American Literature, nature writing

Gordon Taylor

Gordon Taylor

Professor

Marine microbiology, interests in microbial ecology, trophodynamics, anoxia, hypoxia, single-cell analysis, Raman microspectrometry and atomic force microscopy

Lesley Thorne

Lesley Thorne

Assistant Professor

Bio-physical and trophic interactions in marine ecology; application of spatial analysis and landscape ecology techniques to marine conservation

Nils Volkenborn

Nils Volkenborn

Assistant Professor

Sediment biogeochemistry, animal-sediment interactions, benthic ecology

Joe Warren

Joe Warren

Associate Professor

Acoustical oceanography, Zooplankton behavior and ecology

Laura Wehrmann

Laura Wehrmann

Assistant Professor

Marine Biogeochemistry, Geochemical element cycles, Deep Biosphere 

Robert Wilson

Robert Wilson

Associate Professor

Estuarine and coastal ocean dynamics

Christopher Wolfe

Christopher Wolfe

Associate Professor

Physical oceanography, large-scale circulation: theory and modeling.

Karina Yager

Karina Yager

Assistant Professor

Climate change impacts; Remote Sensing; Land-cover and Land-Use Change; Alpine Ecosystems; Andes; Mountain Societies, and Sustainability Studies

Minghua Zhang

Minghua Zhang

Professor

Climate modelling, atmospheric dynamics

Qingzhi Zhu

Qingzhi Zhu

Associate Professor

Chem-/Bio- Sensors, Marine Biogeochemistry, Trace Elements, Environmental Analytical Chemistry

Carl Safina Endowed Research Chair for Nature and Humanity

Carl Safina is the inaugural recipient of the Carl Safina Endowed Research Chair for Nature and Humanity in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

Carl Safina is an international leader in ocean conservation and is the first endowed chair in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. Through Carl Safina’s work, the Safina Center aims to help people understand how the ocean supports all life on our planet. This is a rare opportunity for the campus to celebrate academic and research excellence.

Marinetics Endowed Professorship in Marine Science

The Marinetics Endowed Professorship in Marine Science was made possible by the generous and gratifying support of a donor.  It is conferred to a SoMAS full-time faculty who conducts world-class research in one or more of the following areas: population biology of fisheries, fishery ecology, marine ecology, aquaculture, marine animals, marine animal health, marine habitat health, and closely related areas in marine science.

Bassem Allam has been selected as the first Marinetics Endowed Professor in Marine Sciences. This tremendous honor recognizes the quality, productivity, and importance of Professor Allam’s research. An investiture ceremony will be organized by the university to celebrate the conferral of the professorship. You will be invited to the event at that time.

Coastal Ecology and Conservation Endowed Chair

 Chris Gobler is the inaugural recipient of the Coastal Ecology and Conservation Endowed Chair in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

The Coastal Ecology and Conservation Endowed Professorship was made possible by the generous support of four long term and dedicated donors committed to the research conducted by Chris Gobler.

Stephen Baines

Stephen Baines

Associate Professor

Aquatic ecosystem ecology, ecological stoichiometry

Jeffrey Levinton

Jeffrey Levinton

Distinguished Professor

Conservation biology, developmental evolution

Heather Lynch

Heather Lynch

Assistant Professor

Development and application of statistics

Christine O'Connell

Christine O'Connell

Assistant Professor

connections between science and society, with a focus on marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management, waste management, conservation planning, and ecosystem services.

Dianna Padilla

Dianna Padilla

Professor

Aquatic ecology, applied ecology, conservation biology

Sheldon Reaven

Sheldon Reaven

Associate Professor

Science and technology policy; energy and environmental problems and issues; environmental and waste management, recycling and pollution prevention; risk analysis and life-cycle analysis; nuclear, chemical, and biological threats; technology assessment; homeland security and the war on terrorism

Harold Walker

Harold Walker

Professor

surface chemical processes in natural and engineered systems, with an emphasis on clean water

Adjunct Faculty

James Ammerman

James Ammerman

Adjunct Professor

Ph.D. Marine Biology, 1983, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

Aquatic microbial ecology and biogeochemistry; estuarine, coastal, and open ocean phosphorus cycling; coastal eutrophication and hypoxia; molecular biology of microbial phosphorus assimilation; instrument development and automation; academic leadership and administration; research administration.

Michael Cahill

Michael Cahill

Adjunct Professor

Application and development of environmental law in local government

David Conover

David Conover

Adjunct Professor

Mark Fast

Mark Fast

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Aquatic diseases and Immunology

Charles Flagg

Charles Flagg

Research Professor

Continental Shelf Dynamics, Bio-Physical Interactions in Shelf Systems, Climate Change Effects on Coastal Systems, Shipboard ADCPs on Volunteer Observing Ships

Huan Feng

Adjunct Professor

source, transport and fate of contaminants in estuarine and coastal systems

Roxanne Karimi

Roxanne Karimi

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Dana Hall 167     Ecological stoichiometry of metals, aquatic environmental health, and physiological ecology.

Kemp, Paul
paul.kemp@hawaii.edu
Growth and activity of marine microbes in water column and sediment; benthic-pelagic interactions; molecular ecology of marine bacteria

Lee Koppelman

Lee Koppelman

Professor Emeritus

  Ph.D., 1970 New York University  

Wuyin Lin

Wuyin Lin

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Ph.D., 2002, Stony Brook University Climate Modeling, Climate Change.

Yangang Liu

Yangang Liu

Adjunct Professor

Physical, optical and chemical properties of atmospheric particles, including aerosols, clouds and precipitation

Stephan Munch

Stephan Munch

Adjunct Associate Professor

Evolutionary ecology of growth and life history traits, Evolution in harvested populations, Applied population dynamics modeling, Mathematical modeling and statistics

Emmanuelle Pales-Espinosa

Emmanuelle Pales-Espinosa

Adjunct Associate Professor / Project Associate

Shellfish physiology, Particle selection mechanisms in suspension-feeding bivalves, Algology

Roy Price

Roy Price

Adjunct Assistant Professor / Principal Investigator

Hydrothermal vents, water-rock reactions, toxic metal & metalloid cycling in coastal environments, arsenic bioaccumulation, vent-biota relationships, and alkaline shallow-sea vents

Nicole Riemer

Nicole Riemer

Adjunct Assistant Professor

The interaction of atmospheric transport processes with chemistry and microphysics, particularly for trace gases and aerosol particles in the troposphere

Frank Roethel

Frank Roethel

Adjunct Professor

Discovery Hall 131   Ph.D., 1982, State University of New York at Stony Brook Environmental chemistry, Municipal solid waste management impact

Jay Tanski

Adjunct Lecturer

Coastal erosion processes and management, GIS applications for coastal management

Andrew Vogelmann

Andrew Vogelmann

Adjunct Professor

Atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud and aerosol climate interactions, climate and the Earth’s energy balance, remote sensing, cloud and climate modeling

Bill Wise

Bill Wise

Adjunct Lecturer

Fisheries management, marine law and policy, aquaculture, bon vivant

Sandra Yuter

Adjunct Professor

 

 

Adjunct Lecturers

Mirza Beg

Mirza Beg

Adjunct Lecturer

Maria Brown

Maria Brown

Lecturer

M.S., Long Island University

 

Kimberly Durham

Adjunct Lecturer

Steve Englebright

Steve Englebright

Lecturer

M.S., 1974, Stony Brook University

New York State Senate

James Gilmore

Adjunct Lecturer

Fisheries Management, marine law and policy.

Arthur Kopelman

Adjunct Lecturer

Jeong-A Seong

Adjunct Lecturer

Jay Tanski

Adjunct Lecturer

Coastal erosion processes and management, GIS applications for coastal management

Jeffrey Tongue

Adjunct Lecturer

Michael White

Michael White

Adjunct Lecturer

Bill Wise

Bill Wise

Adjunct Lecturer

Fisheries management, marine law and policy, aquaculture, bon vivant

Stephen Abrams

Stephen Abrams

Flax Pond Manager

Flax Pond Marine Lab 631-675-1285/631-291-5214      

David Bowman

David Bowman

Fleet Manager

Discovery Hall 149  631-632-3155/631-278-2126      

Andrew Brosnan

Andrew Brosnan

Captain

Southampton Marine Station           

Ginny Clancy

Ginny Clancy

Educational Programs Coordinator

105 Endeavour Hall631-632-8681

Michael Doall

Michael Doall

Senior Research Support Specialist

Southampton Campus

 

 

 

Eileen Doyle

Eileen Doyle

Staff Assistant

Endeavour Hall 213   631-632-6912        

Courtney Ferland

Courtney Ferland

Staff Assistant

Natural Sciences 115   631-632-5046        

Christina Fink

Christina Fink

Education Programs Assistant

107 Endeavour Hall631-632-8680

Brian Gagliardi

Brian Gagliardi

Captain

Southampton Marine Station   631-632-5019        

Paulette Gerber

Paulette Gerber

HR Assistant

Endeavour Hall 205   631-632-3071        

John Graham

John Graham

Accounts Assistant

Endeavour Hall 145   631-632-8701        

Chris Harter

Chris Harter

Captain

R/V Seawolf   516-666-0569        

Christina Heilbrun

Christina Heilbrun

Research Scientist

Challenger Hall 155   631-632-8726        

David Hirschberg

David Hirschberg

Senior Research Scientist

Challenger Hall 147631-632-8744  

Charise Kelly

Charise Kelly

Grants Coordinator

Endeavour Hall 145

631-632-3752

 

 

Kim Knoll

Kim Knoll

Staff Assistant

Dana Hall 123 MRAC631-632-8656

Mark Lang

Mark Lang

Computer Support Specialist

Endeavour Hall 133 631-632-3723MS, 2011, Stony Brook University IT and Windows and Mac desktop support, webmaster, IT Partner

Stefanie Massucci

Stefanie Massucci

Assistant Dean

Endeavour Hall 145Phone: 631-632-8781 / Fax: 631-632-8915

Maureen Murphy

Maureen Murphy

Project Staff Associate

Dana Hall 167   631-632-3128        

Steve Ortega

Steve Ortega

Assistant to the Dean

Endeavour Hall 145  631-632-8781      

Christina Ozelis

Christina Ozelis

Academic Advising Assistant

 W0511 Melville Library 631-632-9404

Chris Paparo

Chris Paparo

Marine Sciences Center Manager

Marine Sciences Center  631-632-5020        

Donna Sammis

Donna Sammis

MASIC Librarian

MASIC

631-632-8679

 

 

Christine Santora

Christine Santora

Assistant Director for Policy and Outreach

Discovery Hall 161

631-632-8935

 

 

Jason Schweitzer

Jason Schweitzer

Deckhand and Small Vessel Captain

Discovery Hall 151

 

 

 

Alex Sneddon

Alex Sneddon

Instrument Specialist

Discovery Hall 111631-632-8706

Bonnie Stephens

Bonnie Stephens

Staff Assistant, WRMI

Discovery Hall 125   631-632-8704        

Hanne Tracy

Hanne Tracy

MASIC Librarian

MASIC

631-632-8679

 

 

Diane Vigliotta

Diane Vigliotta

Staff Assistant, ITPA

Endeavour Hall 129

631-632-8009

 

 

Karen Warren

Karen Warren

Assistant to the Director, CIDER

Dana Hall 165   631-632-3162        

Mark Wiggins

Mark Wiggins

Facilities Manager

Discovery Hall 141631-632-8677 / 631-804-6862  

Kaitlin Willig

Kaitlin Willig

Research Technician

Discovery Hall   

Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson

Instrument Engineer

Discovery Hall 107a

Hilary Wolfskill

Hilary Wolfskill

Center Administrator

Advanced Energy Research Center   

Josh Zacharias

Josh Zacharias

Research Technician

Dana Hall   

Tatiana Zaliznyak

Tatiana Zaliznyak

NARMIL Technician

Shelagh Zegers

Shelagh Zegers

Senior Research Support Specialist, Fisher Lab

Dana Hall 115b631-632-8047  

Catherine Ziegler

Catherine Ziegler

Research Technician

Dana Hall   

Faculty Retirements

Mary Scranton
Cindy Lee
James Hoffman

Staff Retirements

Joann Radway
Carol Dovi
Gina Gartin
Eileen Goldsmith

Retirees

As representatives of the public for the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), members of the Dean’s Council are the primary external force moving the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences to the realization of its opportunities for mission fulfillment and service to its constituencies. Working with the Dean and his designated representatives, the Dean’s Council provides advice and guidance in the areas of planning, advancement, organization, and operations. The current Dean’s council members are:

Sarah Chasis Senior Attorney and Director, Oceans Program, Natural Resources Defense Council
Rosalind Walrath Board, New York League of Conservation Voters.
Michael Halpern President, East Hampton Beach Preservation Society
Maureen Sherry Klinsky Board, Peconic Baykeeper
Robert Komitor Levy Phillips & Konigsberg, LLP
Laurie J. Landeau, VMD Associate Director, Aquavet; Marinetics, Inc. and Co-founder, Marinetics
Xiaodan (Danny) Lu, Ph. D. President and CEO, Seawolf Technologies Inc., Chinawind Communications Limited
Robert J. Maze, Ph. D. Co-founder and Vice President of Marinetics, Inc.
Jane Ross Vice President, Alfred and Jane Ross Foundation, Inc.
Andrew Sabin President, Andrew Sabin Family Foundation
Dieter von Lehsten Co-chair, Town of Southampton Sustainability Advisory Committee
Michael White Environmental Law Practice
Michael J. Zeitlin CEO, Aqumin LLC
Christopher Zeppie Director, Environmental Policy, Programs and Compliance at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Ex Officio:
Larry Swanson, Ph. D. Interim Dean, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Deborah Lowen-Klein Assistant Vice President for Advancement, Stony Brook University

Alumni

One of SoMAS’s paramount objectives is to educate and train students to become the next generation of marine and atmospheric scientists, environmental resource managers, and citizens who possess a fundamental grasp of environmental issues and the choices that society faces in handling these issues.  The alumni of our undergraduate and graduate education programs thus represent perhaps most important of the School’s “products,” extending the influence and impact of SoMAS on the broader society of which it is a part.  Of all the things we produce, our alumni are inarguably the most valuable and have the most impact on the issues and problems that command the School’s attention.  SoMAS alums occupy a dizzying variety of positions within academia, natural resource management agencies at all levels, and in the offices of non-governmental organizations.  Alumni are often in a position to play a critical role in support of various SoMAS research and educational efforts.  Several SoMAS alumni are represented on the Dean’s Council, a small assembly of influential individuals who advise the Dean on overall program development priorities and help to get initiatives underway.  Several years ago, SoMAS began a concerted effort to strengthen connections with its alumni.  Working with the Stony Brook University Alumni Association, our alumni records have been consolidated so that our communications with alumni are more comprehensive, reliable and, ultimately, effective.

MSRC/SoMAS produced its first masters degree graduates in 1971 and, a decade later, its first Ph.D. recipients.  Through the years, 911 students have joined the ranks of SoMAS alumni, 266 with the Ph.D. and 715 with a masters degree, and 72 students received both degrees.  As of December 2015, a total of 611 students have graduated with an undergraduate degree from SoMAS.  Of these, 264 received the Environmental Studies degree, 59 the Atmospheric Sciences degree, 120 the Marine Sciences degree and 168 the Marine Vertebrate biology degree.  

To each of our alumni, there is a story.  Alumni below were highlighted between 2014 and 2015.

Mark Nepf (MS, 2017)

Mark Nepf was an MS student in the Dvarskas Lab of Environmental Economics from 2015 to 2017. During his time at SoMAS, he worked on a hedonic analysis of Suffolk County residential real estate, with a focus on the potential impact of coastal water clarity. By determining if improved water clarity could positively influence housing values, his project aimed to provide an economic measure of the benefits of coastal remediation.

After graduation, Mark accepted a position with Resources For The Future, where he is working on similar environmental valuation studies that look at the impacts of air pollution.  He credits his time spent at SoMAS helping him land on the job path he hoped for.

SoMAS alumni create textbook on “Evolution of Meteorology”

Kevin Teague and Nicole Gallicchio were students in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences B.S. Program at Stony Brook University. Kevin graduated in December of 2011, and started working at FleetWeather Inc in Hopewell Junction, NY as a Marine Meteorologist Technician. After Nicole graduated in May of 2012, both decided to open their own private weather forecasting and consulting company, Forecasting Consultants LLC. Together they built and ran the company with success, working with event planners from around the country, various law firms, private contractors, and more.

In April 2015, Kevin and Nicole were asked to be part of an environmental textbook series and started work on researching and authoring their own textbook called The Evolution of Meteorology: a look into the past, present, and future of weather forecasting. This summer, after over two years of dedicated and strenuous research and work, Wiley Blackwell Publishing Company approved and published the textbook. Kevin has continued to be a weather enthusiast while also working full-time in Administration at the North Shore Public Library in Shoreham, NY. Nicole has continued to run and build Forecasting Consultants LLC, while also working full-time in strategic management positions.

Teague, K. A., & Gallicchio, N. (2017). The Evolution of Meteorology: A Look Into the Past, Present and Future of Weather Forecasting. John Wiley & Sons.

Michael Colbert (BS, 2015)

Everyone talks about the weather, but Michael Colbert has more than a casual interest in that topic — he studied it at Stony Brook University.  To be sure, the atmospheric and oceanic sciences major can’t remember a time when he wasn’t passionate about the weather.  “My mother says that as a baby, there were times when I wouldn’t fall asleep unless she took me outside to look up at the sky first,” Michael said.

When he was in elementary school, Michael used writing assignments as an opportunity to report on atmospheric conditions. “What was the weatherman predicting for tomorrow? How long were the icicles hanging off my roof? How strong were the winds last night?”

Michael Colbert uses the School of Journalism’s green screen for a weather forecast

Michael said that growing up in a waterfront home on the Neguntatogue Creek in Lindenhurst, New York — which gave him a front-row seat to view nature’s full force — influenced his decision to pursue atmospheric and oceanic sciences.

“On the coast, you often see precipitation transition from snow to sleet to rain, and then back the other way as cold air comes in at the end of a storm. You also get to see coastal flooding and experience more intense winds found near the ocean,” he said. “During the warm season, the sea breeze can trigger thunderstorms, and that happens to be the topic of my Honors College senior research project — what are the factors that allow some sea breeze boundaries to trigger thunderstorms?”

The Internet has made it easy for Michael to watch the weather unfold minute by minute on satellite and radar. As early as his freshman year in high school, he paid special attention to weather trends, which led to him posting forecasts on Facebook.

When Michael arrived at Stony Brook, he created SBUWeather, a Facebook page managed by the Meteorology Club, which provides forecasts to more than 700 students, staff and faculty on campus and to surrounding communities.  Posting through social media helped provide more exposure for the Stony Brook Meteorology Club which enabled it to grow its current membership to 40 weather buffs. After he was elected president, he and his expanded club created a Web page on which they post forecasts.

Under Michael’s leadership, the club made its debut at the Involvement Fair, wearing T-shirts the members created.  Feeding on a growing interest in the club, Michael began organizing field trips to regional conferences; the National Weather Service in Upton, New York; and local news stations to observe live forecasts. In 2013 “we visited ABC in New York City, and” in fall 2014 “we took a trip to News 12,” he said.  To further increase its exposure, Michael initiated the club’s participation in Earthstock the past two years. The club competed in the 2014 Roth Regatta with a boat named “Hurricane Force.” Regatta.

In 2014 Michael served an internship at the Upton National Weather Service facility, where he collected data using instruments called radiosondes, which are battery-powered devices carried into the atmosphere that transmit findings by radio to a ground receiver. He is also the proud recipient of the Timothy Magnussen Memorial Scholarship for undergraduate students majoring in atmospheric sciences.  During the summer of 2014, he conducted research at Colorado State University, exploring the volume of hail in thunderstorms and associated lightning flash rates. These findings were presented at the American Meteorological Society annual meeting in Phoenix, AZ, in January 2015.

Michael helped coordinate a joint effort with the School of Journalism to provide broadcast experience to atmospheric and oceanic science majors.

“Even though the National Weather Service is my first choice to start my career path, every time I’m in a newsroom I get an overwhelming feeling of excitement, so I hope I get that opportunity to do that at some point in my life,” he said.  Michael started his graduate studies at Penn State in the fall of 2015.

“The weather is something that affects everyone every day. It never stops changing, so I can never stop watching it,” he said.

From Michael Colbert ’15 Is Doing Something About the Weather by Glenn Jochum; photo by John Griffin

Danica Warns (MA, 2015)

According to Danica Warns, “the Marine Conservation and Policy program is a very unique and fast-track graduate program that helped launch my career in environmental conservation.”   She appreciated the flexibility to select the classes she wanted to take and how she could “design (her) capstone project to match (her) career goals” that allowed her “to tailor the program to get the most out of my degree.” As she knew she was interested in a career in environmental outreach, Danica chose to take several courses in the Alda Center for Communicating Science.  The classes “were so valuable and enhanced my communication skills greatly,” she says.

Danica highlights the benefits of the program:

If it weren’t for the flexibility of this program, it would have been difficult for me to meet my goals in such a short period of time. The strong background in current marine conservation issues and communication skills I learned put me in a competitive position for pursuing a career in environmental outreach.

She credits the MCP program for helping her get to her current position, working for the NYC Parks Department engaging volunteers in wetland restoration projects.

Laura Picariello (MA, 2012)

laurapicariello-1q6vppgLaura Picariello, former MCP student, is busy pursuing a career in Louisiana with the Gulf United for Lasting Fisheries, part of the Audubon Nature Institute. As a Research Assistant working with a wide variety of audiences, she says the Marine Conservation and Policy program really helped her find her career.

“You deal with such a wide range of issues in the program,” says Picariello, “it’s not so specialized.”

The fact that the program focuses not only on science coursework, but communication, environmental law, and policy creates an environment where students can about a vast amount of topics in a short amount of time. This leaves them better prepared to find a career, maybe not even one they had expected.

“This opportunity came up. It was not the specific thing I was looking for,” state Picariello, “But I’m thrilled to be here. I’m loving where I’m at, working in the transition between fisheries and management.”

Picariello was traditionally trained as a musician, but found that she couldn’t live away from the ocean. She choose the Marine Conservation and Policy program in order to change her career pathway and improve her job satisfaction. What other advice does she have for current or prospective students wishing to do the same?

“We all had our ideas about where we wanted to go,” she says, “but don’t limit yourself in where you want to go. Being open leads you to interesting places.”

Morgan Gelinas (MS, 2011)

mgelinas1Morgan Gelinas (MS, 2011) studied ship wakes in the Venice Lagoon, Italy.  Here, very large ships routinely navigate a deep dredged channel cut through a shallow lagoon.  The wakes they create propagate over the adjacent shoals for long distances, resuspending sediment as they go.  Morgan described these wakes as Bernoulli waves, or non-linear N-waves, using the same equations that govern the propagation of tsunamis over the deep-ocean basins (Gelinas, M, H. Bokuniewicz, J. Rapaglia, and K.M.M. Lwiza, 2013. Sediment Resuspension by Ship Wakes in the Venice Lagoon Journal of Coastal Research: Volume 29, Issue 1: 8-17. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-11-00213.1).

mgelinas2

She is now a scientist specializing in marine geology and hydrodynamic processes working for EA Engineering, Science and Technology, Inc.  EA has offices from Guam to Maryland and Morgan is leading many of their field efforts.  Her professional duties include such a diverse array of studies such as sediment testing, ocean permitting, marine bathymetric surveys, aquatic site characterizations, interpreting ecotoxicological and bioaccumulation/tissue testing and analysis. Morgan is currently working on a site characterization study in Duluth, MN in the St. Louis River/Lake Superior area, but she has been in most of the Great Lakes in the past two summers on EPA projects. She routinely pilots the boat for bathymetric work or coring all over in the Chesapeake Bay, Gulf of Mexico and greater NYC area.

Greg Marshall (MS, 1988)

Greg Marshall with his crittercam

Greg Marshall with his crittercam

Greg Marshall is the Executive Director and Producer of Remote Imaging at National Geographic Television and Film.  In 1991, Greg began working with National Geographic Television and established the Special Projects Unit, where he developed the technology known as the Crittercam.  The Crittercam is a revolutionary tool that has been used to study the behavior of almost 40 different marine and terrestrial species in their natural habitat.

He has received two Emmy Awards for the National Geographic specials Great White Sharks and Sea Monsters:  Search for the Giant Squid.  Greg also produced the film Tiger Shark and a 13-part series called Crittercam for National Geographic television.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Georgetown University.  Greg earned his master’s degree (1988) in marine environmental sciences from the Marine Sciences Research Center at Stony Brook University.  His research focused on the factors influencing the burying behavior of juvenile queen conch, Strombus gigas.

Greg Marshall returned to SoMAS in 2017 to help us celebrate our 50th Anniversary as the Akira Okubo Distinguished Scholar.

 

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