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Christopher J. Gobler


gobler-headshotEndowed Chair of Coastal Ecology and Conservation

Ph.D., 1999, Stony Brook University

Christopher.Gobler@stonybrook.edu

Coastal ecosystem ecology, climate change, harmful algal blooms, phytoplankton, ocean acidification, effects of multiple stressors on coastal marine resources, aquatic biogeochemistry

Gobler Laboratory page

 


 

Research Interests

We research global coastal change within three major realms:

Harmful algal blooms:

Our group is interested in understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and how that functioning can be effected by man or can affect man. We focus much of our efforts investigating the organisms at the base of aquatic food webs, phytoplankton, and have been particularly focused on harmful algae. We investigate harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by multiple classes of phytoplankton (cyanophyceae, dinophyceae, bacillariophyceae, pelagophyceae, ulvophyceae) in diverse ecosystems (e.g. estuaries, lakes, coastal ocean) using multiple approaches (field studies, laboratory experimental, field experiments, molecular investigations, modeling). Collectively, these studies have identified how nutrients, CO2 levels, zooplankton grazing, viral lysis, allelopathy and grazing by bivalves influence the dynamics of HABs caused by genera such as Alexandrium, Anabaena, Aureococcus, Aureoumbra, Cochlodinium, Dinophysis, Microcystis, Pseuodonitzschia, and Ulva.

Interactions between climate change and eutrophication:

The second major research focus within our laboratory is understanding how climate change and coastal ocean acidification affects marine organisms and ecosystems. The combustion of fossil fuels has enriched levels of CO2 in the world’s oceans and decreased ocean pH. The degradation of anthropogenically-enriched organic matter in coastal ecosystems seasonally has a similar effect on ocean chemistry today, while concurrently depressing dissolved oxygen levels. The continuation of these processes can alter the growth, survival, and diversity of marine organisms. Within this realm, we have been engaged in studies investigating how future and current coastal ocean acidification effects the survival and performance of algae and larvae from bivalves and fish indigenous to North America. We further strive to understand how co-occurring stressors related to both climate change and shallow coastal ecosystems (hypoxia, thermal stress, algal blooms) may act and interact to effect the performance of marine animals.

Phase shifts in coastal ecosystems:

A third area of interest of my lab group is the understanding the ecological functioning and trophic status of shallow marine ecosystems. We investigate how anthropogenic activities such as eutrophication and the depletion of fisheries may alter the natural ecological and/or biogeochemical functioning of coastal ecosystems. In many cases, we have explored the quantitative importance and impacts of various nitrogen loading pathways on primary producers or the interactions and feedbacks among nutrient delivery pathways, pelagic phytoplankton communities, benthic filter feeders, and benthic autotrophs such as seagrass. All of these studies have important societal impacts and relevance for the management of shallow, coastal ecosystems.


Publications

Complete Publications List on Google Scholar


 

The News Articles below feature Dr. Gobler:

Artificial Reef Creation off Shinnecock Inlet

On May 31st, 2018, SoMAS faculty Chris Gobler, Joe Warren, Brad Peterson, Mike Frisk and Interim Dean Larry Swanson joined New York Governor Andrew Cuomo at the first phase of the "largest artificial reef expansion in New York state history."  The Shinnecock reef uses...

SoMAS Faculty Secure $1.1 Million for NY Sea Grant Research Projects

Photo Above: According to Gobler, 2017 was one of the worst years for brown tide and red tides that cause paralytical shellfish poisoning. It covered the entire south shore of Long Island by early June and persisted through late July in Great South Bay, pictured here....

SoMAS Convocation 2018

Congratulations to our graduates!  The annual SoMAS Convocation occurred on Friday, May 18, 2018 at the Student Activities Center auditorium. Students gathered with their friends and family and SoMAS faculty and staff to celebrate the completion of their journey at...

Vax to Flax 2018

Many thanks to those who participated and assisted with the 2018 Flax to Vax Race + BBQ on Saturday April 28th! The overall winner was student Tim Curtin with a time of 26:13. The faculty winner was Chris Gobler with a time of 26:24. The faculty "won" the...

SoMAS Announces Battle of the Bands

This is the 2018 April Fool's gag for the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.  While we are not currently planning any concerts, we aren't ruling anything out! April 1st, 2018.  STONY BROOK, NY.   - In an effort to raise money and close budgetary...

Turning the Tide for Long Island’s Coastal Ecosystems

From TURNING THE TIDE FOR LONG ISLAND’S COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS on The Campaign for Stony Brook, posted on February 8, 2018 in ENDOWED FACULTY, MAJOR GIFTS, RESEARCH & INNOVATION   New Endowed Chair in Coastal Ecology and Conservation helps advance impactful research at...

Retrospective Banquet 2017

Interim Dean Larry Swanson thanks everyone who joined us at our Retrospective Event: This wonderful event brought us all together to reminisce, reflect, and look hopefully to the future." Many thanks to our colleagues who helped put the evening together....

SoMAS 50th Anniversary

Interim Dean of SoMAS, Larry SwansonWelcome to SoMAS! Many opportunities await you here. 2017 will be an exciting year to enter a career in marine and atmospheric sciences as we celebrate our 50th anniversary! Read More from the Dean

U.S Global Change Research Program Climate Science Special Report

From Read the Draft of the Climate Change Report by the New York Times, August 7, 2017 A final draft report by scientists from 13 federal agencies concludes that Americans are feeling the effects of climate change right now. The report was completed this year and is...

Governor Cuomo Takes Hands-On Approach to Support Water Quality

Pictured above, from Left to Right: Governor Cuomo, Prof. Gobler, Assemblyman Fred Thiele, County Executive Steve Bellone and  Assemblyman Steve Englebright. From the Stony Brook University Capitols and Communities Newsletter, June 28, 2017. Governor Andrew Cuomo has...

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