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Christopher J. Gobler


gobler-headshotEndowed Chair of Coastal Ecology and Conservation

Ph.D., 1999, Stony Brook University

Christopher.Gobler@stonybrook.edu

Coastal ecosystem ecology, climate change, harmful algal blooms, phytoplankton, ocean acidification, effects of multiple stressors on coastal marine resources, aquatic biogeochemistry

Gobler Laboratory page

 


 

Research Interests

We research global coastal change within three major realms:

Harmful algal blooms:

Our group is interested in understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and how that functioning can be effected by man or can affect man. We focus much of our efforts investigating the organisms at the base of aquatic food webs, phytoplankton, and have been particularly focused on harmful algae. We investigate harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by multiple classes of phytoplankton (cyanophyceae, dinophyceae, bacillariophyceae, pelagophyceae, ulvophyceae) in diverse ecosystems (e.g. estuaries, lakes, coastal ocean) using multiple approaches (field studies, laboratory experimental, field experiments, molecular investigations, modeling). Collectively, these studies have identified how nutrients, CO2 levels, zooplankton grazing, viral lysis, allelopathy and grazing by bivalves influence the dynamics of HABs caused by genera such as Alexandrium, Anabaena, Aureococcus, Aureoumbra, Cochlodinium, Dinophysis, Microcystis, Pseuodonitzschia, and Ulva.

Interactions between climate change and eutrophication:

The second major research focus within our laboratory is understanding how climate change and coastal ocean acidification affects marine organisms and ecosystems. The combustion of fossil fuels has enriched levels of CO2 in the world’s oceans and decreased ocean pH. The degradation of anthropogenically-enriched organic matter in coastal ecosystems seasonally has a similar effect on ocean chemistry today, while concurrently depressing dissolved oxygen levels. The continuation of these processes can alter the growth, survival, and diversity of marine organisms. Within this realm, we have been engaged in studies investigating how future and current coastal ocean acidification effects the survival and performance of algae and larvae from bivalves and fish indigenous to North America. We further strive to understand how co-occurring stressors related to both climate change and shallow coastal ecosystems (hypoxia, thermal stress, algal blooms) may act and interact to effect the performance of marine animals.

Phase shifts in coastal ecosystems:

A third area of interest of my lab group is the understanding the ecological functioning and trophic status of shallow marine ecosystems. We investigate how anthropogenic activities such as eutrophication and the depletion of fisheries may alter the natural ecological and/or biogeochemical functioning of coastal ecosystems. In many cases, we have explored the quantitative importance and impacts of various nitrogen loading pathways on primary producers or the interactions and feedbacks among nutrient delivery pathways, pelagic phytoplankton communities, benthic filter feeders, and benthic autotrophs such as seagrass. All of these studies have important societal impacts and relevance for the management of shallow, coastal ecosystems.


Publications

Complete Publications List on Google Scholar


 

The News Articles below feature Dr. Gobler:

Summer Updates from SoMAS Faculty

Above: a close-up photo of a bay scallop (Photo by Chris Paparo). Congratulations to the recent research grants awarded to SoMAS faculty! Dr. Bassem Allam and co-PI Dr. Emmanuelle Pales Espinosa have received an Award from NSF in support of the project "RAPID: A...

Celebrating the Class of 2020 – SoMAS Convocation

Congratulations to our graduates!  The annual SoMAS Convocation occurred virtually for the first time on Friday, May 22, 2020 on the SoMAS website, Facebook and YouTube. Students gathered with their friends and family and SoMAS faculty, staff, and fellow students to...

Research Updates from SoMAS Faculty

Photo above: An automated mesocosm called the Red Sea Simulator that will be used by Dr. Karine Kleinhaus for her NSF-funded project. The end of classes at the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences is when research projects kick into full gear. Here are some of...

SoMAS Faculty Wins EPA Advanced Septic System Nitrogen Sensor Challenge

From Long Island Scientist Wins EPA Advanced Septic System Nitrogen Sensor Challenge by Sonia Mohabir on EPA.gov, May 5, 2020. NEW YORK (May 5, 2020) Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that a scientist from Stony Brook University in Stony...

SoMAS Researchers: Dissolved Oxygen and pH Policy Leave Fisheries at Risk

Photo above: Stony Brook’s Christopher Gobler is one of Long Island’s leading experts on water conservation. From Researchers: Dissolved Oxygen and pH Policy Leave Fisheries at Risk on Stony Brook University News, April 23, 2020 Stony Brook University’s Christopher J....

Winter Faculty Research News

Photo above: Dr. Flagg's latest flight over the breach at Old Inlet Here are the latest updates about our faculty and their research. Dr. Hyemi Kim's recent publication "Insignificant QBO‐MJO prediction skill relationship in the SubX and S2S subseasonal reforecasts"...

Celebrating the Top Stories of the Decade

As 2019 draws to a close, so does another decade of Making Scientific Research Count.  The School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences accomplished much in the years between 2010 and 2019, recording $82 million in research expenditures, and over 1,300 degree...

Fall Updates from SoMAS Faculty

Photo above: the 2019 class of SUNY Chancellor's Award recipients, including SoMAS Adjunct Lecturer Maria Brown. Congratulations to SoMAS faculty and staff for their recent awards and recognitions. Interim President Michael Bernstein honored more than 65 faculty and...

Stony Brook Know-How Helps to Protect Long Island’s Water Supply

Photo above: Frank Russo delivers a rundown on Stony Brook University’s Wastewater Research and Innovation Facility. From Stony Brook Know-How Helps to Protect Long Island’s Water Supply on Stony Brook News by Rob Emproto on August 30, 2019. There are now about...

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